Vein Glossary

Below is a glossary of terms related to all aspects of venous disease

0 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Foam Sclerotherapy
Foam sclerotherapy is the injection of a sclerosing solution mixed with either carbon dioxide (C02) or air into a vein that causes thrombosis of the vein and eventual resolution.
  -- Major neurological events following foam sclerotherapy
  -- Complications of foam sclerotherapy
  -- Subcutaneous injection of liquid and foamed polidocanol: extravasation is not responsible for skin necrosis during reticular and spider vein sclerotherapy.


Matting
Cluster of red veins close together that can occur after treatment with sclerotherapy. This is thought to be an inflammatory response.
  -- Determination of Incidence and Risk Factors for Postsclerotherapy Telangiectatic Matting of the Lower Extremity: A Retrospective Analysis


MOCA (Mechano-Chemical Ablation) (Clarivein)
A device that closes off the saphenous vein using sclerotherapy with a small rotating wire at the end of the catheter.


Percutaneous Foam Sclerotherapy
A technique where foam sclerotherapy is injected into a small vein on the skin surrounding a venous ulcer. Percutaneous foam sclerotherapy for venous leg ulcers.
  -- http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24142137


Sclerosant
A term used for the solution used to do sclerotherapy for spider veins. FDA approved solutions are Sotradecol & Polidocanol. Other solutions doctors might use are glycerin and solutions that contain dextrose. Saline is rarely used since the effectiveness is low and it causes pain.


Sclerotherapy
Sclerotherapy is the injection of a sclerosing solution into a vein that causes thrombosis of the vein and eventual resolution.
  -- Sclerotherapy of Spider Telangiectasia—Nursing Considerations


Skin Ulcer
A small sore that rarely occurs after sclerotherapy. Most heal spontaneously but, sometimes a small excision is needed.
  -- Subcutaneous injection of liquid and foamed polidocanol: extravasation is not responsible for skin necrosis during reticular and spider vein sclerotherapy


Staining
Staining refers to a brownish discoloration and often times seen after sclerotherapy treatment. This represents the iron pigment in the blood and resolves in most cases in a few weeks or months.
  -- Cutaneous hyperpigmentation following venous sclerotherapy treated with deferoxamine mesylate.


Ultrasound Guided Sclerotherapy
An ultrasound is used to identify the deeper vessel that will be treated with a sclerosant.


Vulvar Varicosities
Refer to enlarged veins that often occur in conjunction with menstrual cycle locate in the vulvar region of the vagina. Most can be treated with foam sclerotherapy.